UMD to Lead Milestone NSF High School Engineering Pilot Course

UMD to Lead Milestone NSF High School Engineering Pilot Course

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With a nearly $4 million grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF), the University of Maryland will lead a first-of-its-kind nationwide pre-college course on engineering principles and design. The pilot program, entitled Engineering For US All (E4USA), will test the effectiveness of a standardized educational curriculum across multiple states. The course is intended to lead to an eventual pathway for high school students to earn college credit.

High School Students at UMD“Every student should have access to a high-quality pre-college curriculum that teaches engineering principles and practices while incorporating design-based experiences,” said Darryll J. Pines, Principal Investigator (PI) and dean of the University of Maryland’s A. James Clark School of Engineering. “The skills learned in engineering classrooms enable students from demographically and geographically diverse schools to not only become better prepared for the academic challenges within science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) courses, but to become better prepared for life.”

The project is in partnership with Arizona State University, Morgan State University, and Virginia Tech. During the pilot, researchers will refine a curriculum developed by the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) and the College Board. The curriculum will integrate engineering principles and a student design project, and it will align to the Next Generation Science Standards for K–12 education, developed by 26 states and other partners. 

Vanderbilt University, another university partner, will evaluate the curriculum, student learning, and teacher training. Additional collaborators include NASA Goddard, Project Lead the Way, and the College Board. Over 1,000 students at approximately 40 high schools are expected to complete the pilot over the three year period.

"NSF helps build the nation’s future engineering workforce, and a key part of that is enabling more students to have access to and preparation for undergraduate engineering education," said Dawn Tilbury, assistant director of NSF’s Directorate for Engineering. "A standardized high school engineering course will help remove the mystery and democratize the learning and practice of engineering."

In February 2018, more than 100 U.S. deans of engineering indicated their willingness to award credit for entering undergraduate students who have successfully completed a high-quality introductory course in engineering while in high school.

“The College Board shares with the Engineering Deans Council a desire both to expand and diversify the pipeline of students interested in and well prepared to earn engineering degrees," said Trevor Packer, Senior Vice President, Advanced Placement and Instruction at the College Board. "We are eager to see whether a new engineering course in American high schools could increase appetite and readiness among a larger and more diverse set of students to major in engineering, and effectively qualify students for college credit and placement in engineering departments across the country."

By completion of the pilot, hundreds of engineering educators will be involved in shaping the curriculum. The continued support and feedback from high school teachers is critical to the pilot’s success.

“The most important element in student learning is the teacher,” said Margaret J. McLaughlin, part of the E4USA team and associate dean for research and innovation and partnerships at the UMD College of Education. “How we teach students design-based thinking cuts across science standards and other disciplines, which is why it is essential to effectively train teachers to introduce this way of thinking to their students.”

Teachers will be grouped as a network to create a broad learning community. An online platform will enable teachers to collaborate, learn from one another, and receive support by sharing teaching materials and challenges.

“E4USA provides guidelines for learning management systems and the online analytical tools for centralized data collection and protocols,” said Leigh Abts, co-PI and associate researcher with a joint appointment in UMD’s A. James Clark School of Engineering and College of Education. “E4USA will offer teachers online, mentored, video-based professional development supported by online modules and mentoring.”  

For over five years, engineering deans in the ASEE PreK-12 Engineering Education Committee have been laying the groundwork for an advanced high school course in engineering. “I am thrilled that we are that much closer to offering this opportunity to all U.S. students,” said Pines. 

Engineering for US All (E4USA) is supported by the National Science Foundation under NSF Award Number 1849430.

October 1, 2018


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